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Here’s How To Choose The Perfect Pair Of Glasses!

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Nowadays, there are so many choices for eyeglass frames, it can make your head spin. Of course, these endless options also come with benefits: there are frames to suit every face, style and fashion trend.

Having all these choices is exciting, but can be overwhelming if you don’t know what you’re looking for.

In order to pick the perfect pair, it’s good to have a basic understanding of the different materials, features and styles out there, so you can make an informed decision.

Try to keep in mind that although you may be looking for that ‘wow’ factor, comfort, durability and quality are key. After all, you’ll likely be wearing your new specs for a good part of your day.

Here are 5 tips to help you find the glasses that most suit you and your lifestyle:

1. Know Your Material Options

Eyeglass frames come in a variety of materials. Your winning pair can be made from metal, plastic or even wood.

Metal

Metal frames can be found in a wide range of styles and are renowned for their strength and durability. But not all metal frames are the same. There’s a range of metals used for eyeglass frames, each with their own advantages:

  • Titanium: Hypoallergenic, strong, durable, lightweight and corrosion-resistant.
  • Beryllium: Strong, lightweight, flexible, corrosion-resistant and less expensive than titanium.
  • Steel: Strong, lightweight (but heavier than titanium), corrosion-resistant and less expensive than most other metal frames.
  • Monel: Flexible and corrosion-resistant, but contains a combination of metals — so not a first choice if you’re hypersensitive to any type of metal.
  • Aluminum: Flexible, strong, corrosion-resistant, but typically more expensive than other metal frames.
  • Flexon: Very flexible, lightweight, hypoallergenic and corrosion-resistant.

Plastic

Plastic frames are available in a dizzying variety of shapes, styles and colors. They offer a bolder look than metal frames and are often less expensive as well. But plastic frames don’t offer the same degree of durability that metal frames do, so if you’re looking for longer-lasting frames, this is something to consider before making your purchase.

Wood

Wooden frames aren’t only trendy; they’re also very lightweight and comfortable. Wooden frames are made of pure, natural wood and are stained using plant-based treatments — making them an eco-friendly option. They’re also a great choice if you’re looking for a hypoallergenic frame.

2. Understand that Size Does Matter

Eyeglass frames come in so many different sizes. You may want to opt for a smaller frame for reading glasses, but for all day-wear consider a larger frame that will give you a larger viewing window and a wider peripheral view.

3. Choose Comfort

Bridge Fit

Your eyeglasses should sit comfortably on the bridge of your nose. If they’re too big, you’ll constantly be pushing them up, and if they’re too small, they’ll sit too high or pinch your nose.

Temple Style

The temples of your eyeglasses are what secure your frames to your face. They connect the front of the frames to the back of the ears, and sometimes wrap around the head. Most frame temples range from 120 to 150 mm in length. To check that your glasses fit properly, move your head from side to side and even bend down at the waist (it’s worth it!) to make sure that the frames you choose won’t easily fall off.

4. Consider Flexibility

If you lead an active lifestyle, have young children, or sometimes fall asleep with your glasses on, you may want to consider spring hinges. Spring hinges give your temples greater flexibility, making them less likely to break if they’re grabbed or bent the wrong way.

5. Try Different Styles

Not sure which shape or color suits you best? Try on as many frames as you’d like until you find a style that you love. You can either pick a frame that matches your face shape and hair color or decide to be a bit more daring and go for a more striking look. Your options are endless.

When it comes to your vision, we’re here for you. Contact Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg to check out our large selection of eyewear. We’ll help you find the perfect pair, with the perfect fit.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Are metal frames strong enough for sports?

  • A: While metal frames can withstand a certain amount of wear and tear, they aren’t recommended for sports. If you play sports on a regular basis, protective eyewear is the way to go. Protective eyewear, like sports goggles and wraparound frames, not only contain high-impact-resistant polycarbonate lenses, but are also lined with rubber padding to protect your eyes from injury.

Q: Is one pair of eyeglasses enough?

  • A: Depending on your lifestyle and visual needs, one pair of eyeglasses may not suffice.Here are some questions to ask yourself when deciding if you need a second pair of glasses:
      • Do you lead an active lifestyle? If so, it’s important to have a back-up pair of glasses, just in case.
      • Do you have two different optical prescriptions? Some people prefer two different pairs of glasses over wearing bifocal or multifocal lenses.
      • Do you worry about breaking or losing your glasses and having to scramble to order another pair?
      • Do you want your frames to match your wardrobe? Then you may want to think about purchasing more than one frame.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


What Exactly is an Eye Chart?

If there’s one aspect of optometry that everyone recognizes, it’s the traditional eye chart, with its rows of big letters on top, which gradually become smaller the farther down you go. This chart is usually known as the Snellen chart.

Yet how much do you really know about this eye chart? Are all eye charts the same? How are these eye charts used? And when were they invented?

Here’s everything you need to know about eye charts and more!

What is an Eye Chart?

An eye chart is one of the tools your eye doctor uses to assess your eyesight. Based on how well you can see various letters on the chart, your optometrist will determine whether you have myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), presbyopia (age-related farsightedness) or astigmatism, and will measure the prescription that will give you the clearest, most comfortable vision.

Are All Eye Charts The Same?

There are a number of variations to the standard Snellen eye chart. The one an eye doctor uses depends on the personal needs and abilities of the patient. For example, eye doctors will use charts with pictures or patterns for younger children who may not have learned to read or identify letters and numbers.

There are also certain charts that specifically measure distance vision, while others are better for measuring near vision.

History of the Snellen Eye Chart

The Snellen eye chart was developed by Dutch eye doctor Hermann Snellen in the 1860s. Before this standardized eye chart was developed, each eye doctor had their own chart that they preferred to use.

Having so many different eye charts made it impossible to standardize the vision correction available to patients. Eyeglass makers didn’t receive the defined measurements they needed to accurately design, manufacture and measure the optical prescriptions their patients needed.

For the first time, the Snellen eye chart allowed a person to provide a standardized prescription from any eye care provider they chose to any eyeglass maker, and get the same optical lenses to accurately correct their vision.

How The Snellen Chart Is Used in Eye Exams

The standard Snellen chart displays 11 rows of capital letters, with the first row consisting of a single large letter. The farther down the chart you go, the smaller the letters become.

Your eye doctor will ask you to look through a phoropter – an instrument used to test individual lenses on each eye during an eye exam – and look at the Snellen chart placed 20 feet away. Your eye doctor will prescribe the lenses that provide you with the clearest and most comfortable vision.

In many offices, where 20 feet of space may not be available, you’ll be asked to view the chart through a mirror. This provides the same visual experience as if you were standing 20 feet away.

If you have 20/20 vision, it means you can see what an average person can see on an eye chart from a distance of 20 feet. On the other hand, if you have 20/40 vision, it means you can only see clearly from 20 feet away what a person with perfect vision can see clearly from 40 feet away.

If you have 20/200 vision, the legal definition of blindness, this means what a person with perfect vision can see from 200 feet away, you can see from 20 feet away.

Does 20/20 Visual Acuity Mean Perfect Vision?

No. While eye chart tests identify refractive errors, they can’t detect signs of visual skill deficiencies or diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts or macular degeneration. These are diagnosed using advanced equipment as part of a comprehensive eye exam with your local eye doctor. Early diagnosis and treatment of eye conditions are essential to ensuring long-term vision and eye health.

For more information, give us a call at or visit us in person at , today!

Q&A With Your Local Optometrist

How do you keep your eyes healthy?

You only have one set of eyes – don’t take them for granted!

Make sure to implement the following habits for healthy eyes (and body). These include:

  • Eating a balanced diet rich in fiber, fruits and vegetables
  • Drinking plenty of water to hydrate your body and eyes
  • Not smoking, and avoiding 2nd-hand smoke
  • Wearing sunglasses to protect your eyes from ultraviolet (UV) rays
  • Maintaining normal BMI with regular exercise
  • Regular visits to your eye doctor as recommended

What health conditions can an eye exam detect?

A comprehensive eye exam can often detect certain underlying diseases that can threaten your sight and eye health, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, tumors, autoimmune conditions and thyroid disorders. This is why having your eyes checked regularly is key. The earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome and the higher your quality of life.

Protect Your Eyes This Spring by Adopting These 5 Habits

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Spring is in the air! The warm weather, blossoming flowers and smell of freshly cut grass is a welcome relief for anyone who’s ready to put winter behind them. Walks in the park. Barbecues. Playgrounds full of children.

Despite all the spring excitement, it’s important to know that the change in weather can affect your eyes in more ways than one — from prolonged UV exposure and a heightened risk of eye injuries to dry eyes and allergies.

Here are 5 practical ways to protect your eyes this season:

1. Wear Sunglasses with 100% UV Protection

UV protection isn’t only essential for your skin, but also for your eyes.

Prolonged unprotected exposure to the sun’s strong UVA and UVB rays can cause ‘eye sunburn’ (photokeratitis), and UV exposure over months or years can put you at risk of developing sight-threatening eye diseases in the future.

Which is why sunglasses are more than just a fashion accessory. When shopping for sunglasses, look for the label that says ‘100% UV protection.’ This way, you can enjoy the sun without a second thought for your eyes.

And if you believe sunglasses are only meant for sunny days, think again. The sun’s UV rays are so powerful that they penetrate through the clouds and reflect off of water, snow, ice, concrete and many other surfaces.

So before you head out the door, be sure to grab a pair of shades. For even greater protection, also wear a cap or wide-brimmed hat.

2. Drink Plenty of Water

Drinking water — especially on a hot day— is important not only for your overall health, but the health of your eyes. If your body becomes dehydrated your eyes will too, which can lead to symptoms of dry eye and other complications.

Many doctors recommend drinking six 8-ounce glasses of water each day, and more if you’re playing sports or spending lots of time in the sun. So keep a bottle of water close by and drink, drink, drink!

3. Hydrate Your Eyes

Sometimes, drinking water isn’t enough to keep dry eye symptoms at bay.

If your eyes are dry, irritated, itchy or bloodshot, you may have dry eye syndrome. Dry air and wind, air-conditioning and heating systems, certain medications and medical conditions can all cause dry eyes.

Call Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg to schedule a dry eye assessment and learn about your treatment options.

4. Wear Protective Eyewear

The beautiful spring weather calls for outdoor sports, bonfires, barbeques — and in some places, fireworks. Although these activities may be fun, they also pose a risk to your eye health and vision.

To protect your eyes from injury and exposure to extreme heat and smoke, make sure to wear protective eyewear like sports goggles or specialized glasses with polycarbonate lenses.

Most eye injuries can be prevented with the right kind of eye protection.

5. Seek Allergy Relief

Does the mere thought of springtime make your eyes tear and your nose run? You’re not alone. Seasonal allergies are common, and can be frustrating, especially when you’ve been looking forward to spending more time outdoors.

If you suffer from eye allergies, even a morning jog around the block can have you rubbing your eyes for the rest of the day.

Fortunately, there are ways to effectively treat eye allergies and make irritated, itchy eyes a thing of the past.

Contact Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg to learn about the different dry eye and allergy treatments we offer, or to choose eyewear that protects your eyes from sun exposure and injury. We’re here to help you protect your eyes this spring and always.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is Dry Eye syndrome?

A: Dry eye syndrome (DES) is a chronic condition that occurs when your eyes don’t produce enough tears, or there is insufficient oil in your tears.

Some of the most common causes of DES include:

  • Environmental factors – living in a dry, dusty or windy climate
  • Hormonal changes – especially during pregnancy and menopause
  • Certain medications – antihistamines, blood pressure medications and antidepressants, among others
  • Eyelid conditions – like meibomian gland dysfunction and blepharitis
  • Post-LASIK surgery

Symptoms can be mild or severe and cause your eyes to feel dry, sore, itchy, and watery. Treatment for DES varies, depending on the underlying cause, but can range anywhere from medicated eye drops and ointments to in-office procedures.

Q: How are eye allergies treated?

A: The most effective way to treat your eye allergies is to first find out what’s causing them.

Eye allergies can be triggered by:

  • Airborne substances found in nature such as pollen from flowers, grass and trees
  • Indoor allergens such as pet dander, dust and mold
  • Irritants such as cosmetics, chemicals, cigarette smoke and perfume

To alleviate your symptoms, your eye doctor may recommend OTC lubricating eye drops, medicated eye drops that replace the oil in your tears, or eye drops (or oral medications) that contain an antihistamine.

If these eye drops don’t provide enough relief, your eye doctor can discuss a range of in-office treatments or prescribe a stronger medication to provide long-lasting relief for your allergic eyes.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


7 Signs That Your Child May Need Glasses

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Poor eyesight can cause children to lag behind in class or on the sports field, which may impact their self-esteem.

So how can parents tell when it’s time to take their child to an eye doctor? Here are some signs that your child’s eyesight may benefit from prescription eyeglasses.

1. They Squint a Lot

If your child sometimes squints their eyes when trying to focus on a distant object, they may have a condition called myopia, or nearsightedness. Squinting reduces the amount of light that enters the eye and helps to focus incoming light onto the center of the retina, resulting in sharper vision.

2. They Complain of Headaches

Children who have uncorrected farsightedness or astigmatism are very susceptible to headaches, especially after reading or doing near work. That’s because their eye muscles have to work very hard to focus on the words or objects in front of them.

3. They Frequently Rub Their Eyes

Eye rubbing can be a sign of tiredness or eye infection, but pay attention to when your child rubs their eyes. If they do so when trying to read or visually concentrate on something, they may have a vision problem. Many children don’t have the verbal skills to communicate a vision problem and may simply rub their eyes to try and eliminate the blurry vision they’re experiencing.

4. They Sit Too Close to the Board, TV or Digital Screen

Is your child holding up their book or phone too close to their face? Do they bring their seat right up to the TV screen? If so, their eyesight might be to blame. While nearsightedness is a fairly common problem, it is easily correctable with a pair of prescription glasses.

5. They Close One Eye

When a child closes one eye to focus on something, it may indicate an uncorrected refractive error or binocular vision problem. When the two eyes aren’t able to work in tandem, the child may unconsciously close one eye to enable the stronger eye to send a clear image to the brain.

6. They Seem Clumsy

Do they keep tripping or bumping into things because they are clumsy, or because they simply can’t see very well? The best way to tell is through a comprehensive eye exam with an optometrist.

7. Reading Is a Challenge

Refractive errors and other vision problems can make it very difficult for a child to read. Children with uncorrected vision problems may often lose their place while reading, skip lines, use their fingers to point to each word or may avoid reading altogether. In fact, many children who have undiagnosed vision problems are mistakenly diagnosed with a learning disability. That’s why it’s important for children who are struggling in school to undergo a thorough eye exam with their optometrist.

We Provide Pediatric Eye Exams and More!

If any of the above signs apply to your child, it’s time for a thorough evaluation with an optometrist. At Crest Eyecare, our friendly and knowledgeable staff use a very gentle and welcoming approach with young patients to help every child feel safe and comfortable throughout the process.

Whether your child needs glasses, contact lenses or other eyewear, we can help them find their perfect fit.

And remember, basic vision screenings offered by schools or pediatricians do not replace the care and expertise of an optometrist.

To schedule your child’s appointment and learn more about the services we offer, call Crest Eyecare in ​​Winnipeg today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How often do children need to have their eyes examined by an optometrist?

  • A: According to the American Optometric Association, children should have their eyes evaluated by an optometrist at ages 6 months, 3 years, before entering first grade and every school year after that. Some children may need more frequent optometrist visits, depending on their risk factors or other conditions.

Q: What are the most common vision problems among children?

  • A: The most common vision problems found in children are refractive errors (farsightedness, nearsightedness, astigmatism), lazy eye, crossed eyes and color deficiency. A thorough visual evaluation will help rule out any of these conditions in your child.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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3 Reasons to Buy Eyeglasses from an Optical Store vs Online

Quality Eye Care in Winnipeg

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, online shopping has grown in popularity. But when it comes to your eye health, nothing beats an in-person eye exam and fitting. While searching for specs online is a fantastic way to discover the current trends in eyewear, there are some key reasons you should buy your glasses from your local eye care shop.

Quality Eye Care in Winnipeg

Accuracy

According to the American Optometric Association, 29% of glasses ordered online from the top 10 online retailers arrived with incorrect prescription lenses. Incorrect lenses make it impossible to see clearly and can induce headaches and eye strain. When you buy glasses at an optical store, you can be sure you’ll get the perfect prescription and fit, assuring clear vision and maximum comfort.

High Quality

Poor-quality frames may end up costing you more in the long run. While searching the web, frames may appear to be high-end but actually composed of low-grade materials. Frame materials that aren’t up to grade can limit their durability and irritate your skin. Furthermore, after a few months of use, the sun’s intense rays may even bleach the frames.

Personal Service and Continuity

Why do so many individuals return year after year to their neighborhood optical store? Because they receive excellent service from someone they can rely on. Doing so ensures continuity of treatment and the certainty that your doctor will examine your eyes to assess both your visual acuity and eye health.

Finally, by shopping locally, you are contributing to the strength of your community.

When considering where to buy your next pair of glasses, keep all of these criteria in mind. While the initial price difference between an online and in-person purchase may be enticing, it comes at a cost. Looking for a new pair of glasses? Contact Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg to receive the highest level of care and quality.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How can I make sure my glasses are adjusted to fit properly?

  • A: Most online stores will adjust them based on a standard fit, while brick-and-mortar eyewear retailers will adjust your glasses to fit your personal needs.

Q: How frequently should I replace my glasses?

  • A: If your prescription has changed, you should get a new pair. See your optometrist every year or two to maintain clear vision.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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5 Tips To Encourage Your Child To Keep Their Glasses On

Eye Doctor in Winnipeg

Eye Doctor in Winnipeg

If your child wears glasses, then you may be familiar with the struggle of trying to keep their glasses on. Whether their specs are constantly falling off, or they refuse to wear them in the first place, here are a few tips to help ensure that your child’s glasses remain where they belong: on their face!

1. Highlight Other Family Members Who Wear Glasses

Kids are sometimes apprehensive to try new things, especially things that seem foreign to them. That’s why it may be helpful to show them how common glasses are by pointing out other family members and friends who wear glasses. Once they view glasses as commonplace, they may be more accepting of wearing them.

2. Involve Them In Choosing Their Frames

Inviting your child to pick out their new frames will give them a sense of control and ownership. This will, in turn, lead them to want to wear their glasses. So next time you buy them glasses, select a few options and have them choose the pair they like most.

3. Compliment Their New Look

If your child chooses a frame style that isn’t your first choice, avoid showing any disappointment. A parent’s positive and encouraging attitude is crucial for kids who are resistant to wearing glasses.

Aside from discussing how glasses help people see, play up the style aspect of glasses to help your child love their new look.

4. Fix The Fit

If your child’s glasses are frequently sliding down their face, consider this:

A child’s nose bridge isn’t as developed as an adult’s, which means that glasses have a harder time staying in place on their small faces. Many types of children’s frames take this into account and have adjustable nose pads.

If you find that the fit still isn’t secure and comfortable, bring your child to Crest Eyecare, where we’ll be happy to adjust the glasses to perfectly fit their face.

5. Consider Using a Band or Other Anti-Slip Product

Slipping glasses is all too common with children, which is why companies have created products to secure children’s glasses. Ask your local optician about bands that attach to the temples, or anti-slip nose grips.

Adjusting to new glasses can take time, and that’s okay. With a positive attitude and a healthy dose of patience, parents can use these tips to help ease their child’s transition to wearing glasses.

If your child is having trouble with their glasses or experiencing any other vision-related issue, we can help. To schedule an appointment and learn about what we offer, contact Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How often do children need to have their eyes examined?

  • A: Typically, a child’s first eye exam should be around 6 months of age. The next comprehensive eye exam should be between ages 3-5, and before first grade, and then annually thereafter. A child’s vision can change quickly, so don’t skip your child’s next eye exam!

Q: How can I tell if my child needs new glasses?

  • A: Signs that your child needs new specs may include: blurred vision, eye fatigue, headaches or squinting. It’s also advisable to get your child a second pair of glasses as a backup. The best way to know whether your child needs new glasses is through a comprehensive eye exam.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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How Poor Nutrition and Lifestyle Can Lead to Cataracts

Optometrists in Winnipeg

Optometrists in Winnipeg

Cataracts are a natural part of the aging process. They obstruct vision by clouding the lens of the eye, making it opaque and difficult to see clearly. Cataracts are a leading cause of vision loss and blindness worldwide. While there is no non-surgical cure for cataracts, research has shown that some foods and dietary supplements appear to delay the progression of this sight-threatening eye condition in certain people.

According to a study published by Nutrients (2019), oxidative stress causes damage to proteins and enzymes in the lens, which leads to cataract formation. An imbalance between free radicals (atoms that destroy cells in your body) and antioxidants (which diminish them) causes oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs when you don’t have enough antioxidants to neutralize the free radicals in your body.

Unhealthy foods are one major source of free radicals. According to some optometrists, eating a high-antioxidant diet can help slow the progression of cataracts and even lower your risk of developing cataracts in the first place.

What Foods to Avoid For Good Vision

Leading a healthy lifestyle is one of the surest ways to maintain good vision. This includes exercising, eating enough fruits and vegetables and making informed health decisions. Soft drinks, processed foods, fried foods and sugary snacks should all be avoided, as they’ve been shown to increase the risk of developing cataracts earlier in life.

It’s also a good idea to cut down on your sodium intake, as a study published by the American Journal of Epidemiology (2000) found that a high salt intake makes people more likely to develop cataracts.

Because cataracts are a natural part of aging, most older people will develop them at some point in their lives. To postpone the advent of cataracts, try consuming these foods and supplements.

Which Foods to Include in Your Diet to Prevent Cataracts

Ideally, you should eat 2 servings of fish each week, 3 servings of whole grains daily, and 5 to 9 servings of vegetables and fruits per day to reduce your risk of cataracts. The following are some of the most beneficial food sources for lowering your risk of this common eye disease.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

When it comes to keeping your eyes healthy, omega-3 fatty acids are nothing short of a superfood. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce your risk of developing cataracts and keep your eyes hydrated by supplying essential oils for your tear layer.

Flax seeds are regarded as one of the greatest sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Other sources include grass-fed beef, tofu, and fatty fish such as cod, salmon, sardines and halibut.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C has long been known to help prevent colds, but it can also help lower your risk of cataracts. Guava and oranges are a good source of this vitamin. Vitamin C is also abundant in red and green chili peppers, bell peppers, dark leafy greens, kiwi, papaya and broccoli.

Nuts and Seeds

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that helps to protect the membranes of your eyes. Walnuts, for instance, are high in vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants.

Almonds, sunflower seeds, hazelnuts and peanuts are among the nuts and seeds that are excellent for your eyes.

Whole Grains

Not only do whole grains boost your eye health but they can reduce your risk of developing cataracts early on. Try adding quinoa, oatmeal, rye, wheat, brown rice, wheat and sorghum to your diet.

Fruits and Vegetables

Carotenoids are the pigments that give yellow, red, and orange fruits and vegetables their color. These items can be eaten raw, but for the best results, you should boil them first. Cantaloupes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and pumpkins contain carotenoids such as beta carotene and vitamin A, which help to prevent cataracts.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2019), adding 10 mg of carotenoids to your diet lowers your risk of developing cataracts by roughly 26%. The maximum antioxidant content is found in vegetables and fruits. When shopping, look for fruits and vegetables with a variety of hues. Eat the skins whenever possible because they’re high in lutein, zeaxanthin, and vitamins A, C and E.

No one antioxidant can stop free radicals from causing oxidative stress, so it’s crucial to consume a wide range of antioxidant-rich foods.

Although this list isn’t complete, consuming these foods can help strengthen your eyes and may stave off cataracts for a time.

Routine Eye Exams

Even if you have perfect vision right now, seeing your eye doctor on a regular basis is one of the best ways to preserve it. Your eye care provider can check for signs of cataracts and other eye conditions during annual visits.

Early detection can help save your sight. Contact Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg, to schedule an eye exam to ensure you have healthy vision for years to come.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What else can I do to prevent cataracts?

  • A: Besides ensuring you lead a healthy diet, make sure to protect your eyes from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. UV rays emitted by the sun are known to increase a person’s risk of cataracts. You can easily do this by wearing UV-blocking sunglasses along with a wide-brimmed hat.In addition, if you smoke, quit smoking, as it releases free radicals in the body, increasing your risk of cataracts.

Q: Can cataracts cause blindness?

  • A: Left untreated, cataracts cause gradual vision loss, eventually leading to legal blindness or even total blindness. Fortunately, there are various measures you can take to prevent this from occurring, such as undergoing cataract surgery.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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In addition, if you smoke, quit smoking, as it releases free radicals in the body, increasing your risk of cataracts.”
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Diet and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Eye Doctors in Winnipeg

Eye Doctors in Winnipeg

“Eat your carrots—they’re healthy for your eyes”, or at least that’s what you’ve been told. While carrots contain important nutrients that are beneficial for vision and eye health, dark leafy green veggies contain higher levels of nutrients that may help delay the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

These are not the only foods that may help protect your vision. If you want to keep your eyes healthy, there are others we recommend you consume (or avoid!)

What Diet is Good for Macular Degeneration?

To prevent or delay AMD, you should consume a diet containing adequate levels of certain vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. A Mediterranean-style diet, which includes plenty of fruits and vegetables, seafood, and nuts and seeds, is a good place to start.

The National Eye Institute advises a nutrient formula to help lower the chance of AMD progression, regardless of how healthy your diet is. That formula is known as the AREDS2 formula eye vitamins. Nonetheless, getting key nutrients from foods and supplements is always a good idea.

Best Foods for Macular Degeneration

Your diet should include the following nutrients:

Antioxidants

Vitamins A, C, and E are all antioxidants that help prevent cellular damage. For Vitamin A, make sure you eat a lot of carotenoids, such as kale, spinach and yams, all of which include the ‘eye vitamins’ lutein and zeaxanthin. Vitamin C can be found in citrus fruits or broccoli, and Vitamin E is abundant in nuts, seeds, and oils.

Omega-3 fatty acids

There are three significant Omega-3s: EPA, DHA (both of which are found in fatty fish), and ALA, found in nuts and seeds. Omega-3 fatty acids help the body fight inflammation, which researchers believe plays a role in AMD. These fatty acids may also help reduce bad cholesterol, which has been associated with AMD.

Zinc and copper

These trace minerals both directly and indirectly contribute to eye health. Zinc, for example, aids in the absorption of the antioxidant vitamin A and regulates cellular function. Zinc is abundant in meats, shellfish, and legumes (i.e. chickpeas). For copper, eat a lot of dark leafy greens as well as seeds, nuts, and eggs.

What Foods Should I Avoid to Prevent Macular Degeneration

It should come as no surprise that the same things that clog your heart’s blood vessels also clog the tiny blood vessels in your eyes. Avoid fast foods and limit your intake of the following, especially if you have high cholesterol:

  • Tropical oils, like palm oil
  • Fatty pork, beef and lamb
  • Processed foods that contain trans fats
  • Vegetable shortening, lard and margarine
  • High-fat dairy foods

Sweets and sugary drinks should also be avoided since they induce inflammation, which leads to the production of eye-damaging free radicals. Moreover, sugary and fatty foods are abundant in calories and are a leading cause of obesity, which has been associated with AMD.

At Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg we care about you and your vision. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Tola Opejin to find out what else you can do to protect your vision.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

  • A: Age-Related Macular Degeneration refers to the deterioration of the central part of the retina, the inside back layer of the eye that records the images we see and sends them back to the brain. When the macula is functioning properly, it collects highly detailed images at the center of our vision and sends neural signals through the optic nerve to the brain, which interprets them as sight. When the macula deteriorates, the brain does not receive these clear, bright images, and instead receives blurry or distorted images. AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in people over 60. This number is expected to double to nearly 22 million by 2050.

Q: What are the symptoms of AMD?

  • A: The first symptoms that you may experience of macular degeneration can include:The first symptoms that you may experience of macular degeneration can include:
    • Lines appearing wavy
    • Decreased or blurry vision
    • Blind or dark spots in the center of your vision
    • In rare cases, different color perceptio

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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Can Blue Light Glasses Help with Digital Eye Strain?

Computer Glasses & Designer Frames in Winnipeg

Computer Glasses & Designer Frames in Winnipeg

Every day, people around the world are exposed to blue light from the sun, indoor lighting and digital screens.

Blue light causes eye strain and interrupts the circadian rhythm, influencing our sleep patterns. Researchers are now looking into whether excessive exposure to blue light poses any other risks to eye health.

What Exactly Is Blue Light?

Blue light are light rays of a specific wavelength that, although they enter the eye, are not perceived as the color blue.

Blue light has a short wavelength and produces a high amount of energy (from 400 to 500 nanometers). Thus, it’s also known as high-energy visible light (HEV). In fact, blue light is emitted by any source of visible light, whether it’s an artificial source like a light bulb or digital screen, or a natural one like the sun.

How Does Blue Light Affect The Eye?

Each color of visible light has its own energy level and wavelength. Blue light can reach the retina at the back of the eye because of its short wavelength and strong intensity.

A study published by the International Journal of Ophthalmology (2018) found that the retina’s light-sensitive nerve cells can be damaged when exposed to excessively high levels of blue light.

In addition, researchers are concerned about whether the blue light emitted by digital devices like cell phones, tablets and computers is enough to qualify as excessive exposure that could result in eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration.

Since blue light has more energy, it contributes to digital eye strain. When compared to other light rays, this exacerbates light scattering when it enters the eye. As the scattered blue light rays enter the eye, they cause ‘visual noise,’ making it difficult for the eye to focus the light accurately.

Symptoms of digital eye strain include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Eyestrain and headaches
  • Neck, back and shoulder pain
  • Frequent rubbing or blinking of the eyes
  • Difficulty with accommodation (focusing between far and near)

What Are Blue Light Glasses and Do They Make a Difference?

Blue light glasses, also known as computer glasses, have lenses with a yellow tint, which have been shown to improve comfort levels when viewing digital devices for prolonged periods of time. With blue light blocking glasses, you can enjoy your screen time and reduce or prevent digital eye strain.

Getting Blue Light Glasses

If you decide to purchase blue light glasses, they’re available with or without a prescription. You can also buy single-lens computer glasses to match your prescription if you’re farsighted and wear progressive lenses or bifocals.

You might want to consider buying photochromic lenses, which provide both UV and blue light protection whether you’re indoors or out in the sun. When exposed to UV rays, the lenses automatically darken, and become clear again once indoors.

At Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg we offer a variety of blue light glasses and lenses. Contact us today to discuss your ideal pair of lenses with features to match your look and lifestyle.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Where can blue light be found?

  • A: The largest source of blue light is sunlight. LED and fluorescent lights, smartphones, computer screens and tablets also emit blue light, but at levels much lower than the sun.

Q: Besides blue light glasses, how can I protect my eyes against blue light?

  • A: Try to reduce the amount of time you spend in front of a digital screen and take frequent breaks to give your eyes a rest.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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Do Blue Light Glasses Really Work?

Best Blue Light Glasses in Winnipeg

Best Blue Light Glasses in Winnipeg

In today’s digital world, optometrists everywhere are hearing this question more and more: ‘Are blue light glasses worth it?’

Although some controversy surrounds blue light’s impact on eye health, there’s enough scientific evidence to offer a reliable answer.

What is Blue Light?

Blue light is a high-energy, short-wavelength light on the visible spectrum. Blue light is mostly emitted from the sun (hence, the reason our skies appear blue) but is also released by indoor light sources and digital screens.

Our eyes and brain interpret blue light rays as a wake-up signal because they stimulate alertness.

It’s worrying, as more and more people stare at digital screens throughout the day and often into the night.

Is Blue Light Harmful To Our Eyes?

Because blue light has a higher frequency and energy than other colors of light, it can easily penetrate the structures of our eyes and reach the retina, the light-sensitive lining at the back of the eye.

Studies, such as the one published in Integrative Biology (2017), found that blue light does have negative effects on human retinal cells and increases oxidative damage—even at frequencies similar to ones emitted by digital screens.

Other research has linked blue light exposure to reduced sleep quality, especially when using a digital device at night.

Prolonged blue light exposure can also lead to digital eye strain, eye fatigue and dry eye syndrome.

For this reason, blue light lens filters and glasses were created to offset the negative effects of blue light overexposure.

How Blue Light Glasses Can Help

Better circadian rhythm

A study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health (2015) found that teenagers who wore blue-blocking glasses in the evening hours had better circadian rhythms than peers who didn’t use blue light glasses. Circadian rhythms regulate the sleep-wake cycle.

Reduces eye fatigue

Another study published in the Asia-Pacific Journal of Ophthalmology (2015) suggested that blue-blocking glasses or lenses may be effective in reducing eye fatigue.

Reduced symptoms of computer vision syndrome

A survey published in the Journal of Medical Imaging (2019) found that radiology residents who wore blue light filtering glasses experienced significantly reduced symptoms of computer vision syndrome (or digital eye strain).

What’s The Bottom Line?

Blue light-blocking glasses can be effective in improving sleep quality and lessening symptoms of computer vision syndrome and eye fatigue when staring at a screen.

If you spend a lot of time in front of a digital screen, speak with your eye doctor to determine if you could benefit from blue-blocking glasses or lenses.

To schedule an eye exam or learn more about what we offer, call Crest Eyecare in Winnipeg today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: In addition to wearing blue-blocking glasses, what are some other tips for relieving digital eye strain?

  • A: Take frequent breaks from screen use and try to stick to the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes, shift your gaze to something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds. Consider putting a blue light filter on your computer or phone screens. Also, try to avoid screen time at least 2 hours before bed in order to feel less awake. Lastly, speak with your optometrist. If you or a family member has any symptoms of digital eye strain, we can help.

Q: Can children and teens benefit from wearing blue light glasses?

  • A: Yes! Children and teens who use digital screens for schoolwork and recreational activities on a daily basis may experience symptoms of eye fatigue or eye strain without even knowing it. Blue-blocking glasses may be the key to relieving their headaches, blurred vision or improving their circadian rhythms. Speak with us about blue-blocking glasses or lens filters for your child today.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Crest Eyecare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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